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SESSIONS
 
DAY 1 - June 26
 
9.30-10.30 am
KEYNOTE ADDRESS Jaswant Singh
(Former Minister of Finance and Foreign Affairs, Leader of Opposition)
 
10.30-11.00 am
Coffee Break
 
11.00-12.30
Kashmir: Melting the Snows, Reinventing the Imagination
 
12.30-1.15 pm
Lunch
 
1.30 pm- 3 pm
Inherited Poisons: Can the young defang them?
 
3 pm -3.30 pm
Coffee Break
 
3.30-5 pm
The Western Factor: Spoiler or benign interference?
 
DAY 2 - June 27
 
9.30 am-10.30 am
KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Imran Khan

(President, Tehreek-e-Insaf & Ex Cricket Captain, Pakistan)
 
10.30 am-11.00 am
Coffee Break
 
11 am-12.30 pm
Democracy, Trade and the War against Terror
 
12.30-1.15 pm
Lunch
 
1.30-3 pm
Art and Cinema: Creating and eroding stereotypes
 
3 pm-3.30 pm
Coffee Break
 
3.30-5 pm
INTELLIGENCE SQUARED DEBATE
The role of religion is the fundamental difference between India and Paksitan
 
 

SESSIONS

DAY 1

9.30-10.30 am
Keynote Address
Jaswant Singh (Ex Minister of Finance and Foreign Affairs, Leader of Opposition, India)
ALSO: Special Vision Statements by Asif Ali Zardari and Nawaz Sharif on Indo-Pakistan relations

10.30-11.00 am - Coffee Break

11.00-12.30
Kashmir: Melting the Snows, Reinventing the Imagination

Moderator: Harinder Baweja

Panelists :

Arun Jaitly, (Ex Law Minister, General Secretary BJP)
Lt General (rtd) Asad Durrani, (Ex ISI Chief, Pakistan)
Dr. Abhishek Singhvi, (MP, Lawyer and National Spokesperson, Congress Party)
Farooq Abdullah, (Ex Chief Minister, Jammu & Kashmir, India)
Mehbooba Mufti, (President Jammu & Kashmir Peoples Democratic Party)
Sartaj Aziz, (Ex Finance & Foreign Minister Pakistan)

SESSION NOTE: Kashmir has been the intractable root at the heart of the Indo-Pak conflict since Partition. The two nations have fought three debilitating wars over Kashmir: 60 years later, it remains the biggest stumbling block to bi-lateral relations. Governments on both sides have largely remained stuck in stated positions that have lost meaning over time. Many proposals lie on the drawing board: Softer borders. Joint control mechanisms. A more autonomous Kashmir. Greater trade relations. A panel comprising key players from all sides of the argument will discuss the issue and the possible leaps forward.

12.30-1.15 pm - Lunch

1.30 pm-3 pm
Inherited Poisons: Can the young defang them?

Moderator: Shoma Chaudhury

Panelists:
Arshed Bhatti, (Advisor, Youth Policy, Government of Pakistan)
Mushahid Hussain, (Ex Information Minister, Pakistan)
Sachin Pilot, (MP, Standing Committee on Home Affairs, India)
Tarun Vijay, (Director, Dr. Syama Prasad Mookerjee Research Foundation, India)
Ziauddin Sardar, (British Author)

SESSION NOTE: The young can be both a promise of new things and a calcification of the old. On which side are the young of Pakistan and India weighted? The memory of Partition stood for both a poison and an ache for reconciliation. With its fading, are we now faced with new fundamentalisms, a wave of neo-nationalisms or are our young ready to shed the baggage of the past? Are we ready to look at each other with healthy self-confidence as individual nations, not corrosively joint forever at the hip, or are we sprouting new irreconcilable hostilities? The jehadis or the cosmopolites who represents the dominant mood among our young? What role does the diaspora play? What governs the mindscape of the young? Young leaders from both nations offer insight.

3 pm -3.30 pm - Coffee Break

3.30-5 pm
The Western Factor: Spoiler or benign interference?

Moderator: Harinder Baweja

Panelists:
AK Doval, (Ex Director Intelligence Bureau, India)
Robin Raphel, (Diplomat, Senior Vice President at the National Defense University in Washington)
Manish Tewari, (National Spokesman, Congress, India)
Mushahid Hussain, (Ex Information Minister, Pakistan)
Sir Hilary Synnott, (Consulting Senior Fellow, International Institute for Strategic Studies)
Tanvir Ahmad Khan, (Ex Foreign secretary Pakistan)

SESSION NOTE: In a nuclear world, increasingly connected in complex ways, a possible Indo-Pak flashpoint is an obvious area of concern for global players. Western nations primarily the US and UK have been involved and interested in Kashmir and Indo-Pak relations for decades. Traditionally, Pakistan has favoured third party mediation on Kashmir, while India has been strongly opposed to it. Yet, third parties have nudged the two neighbours into reconciliation at critical points in the past. Former US President Bill Clinton mediated the withdrawal of Pakistani troops from Kargil in 1999; the two standing agreements between India and Pakistan were brokered by a third party. Yet, the "western factor" in Central Asia, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, to name just a few nations, have had very disturbing fallouts. Is the western factor, then, to be shunned or welcomed? Given India's new friendship with the US, how have equations changed?


DAY 2

9.30-10.30 am
Keynote Address
Imran Khan (President, Tehreek-e-Insaf & Ex Cricket Captain, Pakistan)

10.30 am -11.00 am - Coffee Break

11 am-12.30 pm
Democracy, Trade and the War against Terror

Moderator: Harinder Baweja

Panelists:
Dr. Abhishek Singhvi, (MP, Lawyer and National Spokesperson, Congress Party)
Anees Jilani, (Lawyer, Pakistan)
Imran Khan, (President, Tehreek-e-Insaf & Ex Cricket Captain, Pakistan)
Ram Jethmalani, (Ex Law Minister, Government of India)
Sartaj Aziz, (Ex Finance & Foreign Minister Pakistan)
Swapan Dasgupta, (Political Commentator, India)

SESSION NOTE: It is an ordinary truism that trade interests can penetrate the most resistant boundary. What initiatives can India and Pakistan take in this arena? What are the priority areas, the obvious engagements, the points of mutual profit? Equally, democracy can be a dual-edged sword, spelling both freedom and chaos. Can our countries manage their internal contradictions, or are we in danger of spiraling into newly troubled waters? In India, both the BJP and the Congress have demonstrated a common intention towards Pakistan. What does democracy in Pakistan spell for India? What role can the UK and US play in stabilizing and controlling the export of terror from these countries? How do their trade interests govern and complicate their foreign policies? Business and political leaders discuss the new lie of the land.

12.30-1.15 pm - Lunch

1.30-3 pm
Art and Cinema: Creating and eroding stereotypes

Moderator: Shoma Chaudhury

Panelists:
Hasan Zaidi, (Filmmaker, Pakistan)
Kamila Shamsie, (Pakistani Author)
Karan Johar, (Indian director, Producer, TV celebrity)
Mohammad Hanif, (Pakistani author)
Naiza Khan, (Pakistani artist)
Prasoon Joshi, (Executive Chairman & Regional Executive Director Asia Pacific, McCann Worldgroup & Lyricist, India)

SESSION NOTE: In the final cut, the texture of relations between human beings and nations is governed by the imagination. How do we think of the "other"? As enemy or friend? Fatal doppleganger or potential ally? Separated twin or bullying big brother? Severed by a bitter cut, and barred for decades from even a glimpse of each other no phone calls, no visits, no reconciliation for years India and Pakistan imagined each other only through the prism of Partition. Ranging from sensitive evocation to blatant jingoism, the arts literature, poetry, films, music all revolved around that rupture, smoking hatred and pain with the memory of things lost. But the scar of Partition is no longer important for a new generation. And so a new moment presents itself. What new self images can we draw for ourselves? What role can the arts play in shaping new dialogues around India and Pakistan? How can films, music and literature be deployed to dissolve boundaries?

3 pm -3.30 pm - Coffee Break

3.30-5 pm
DEBATE
The role of religion is the fundamental difference between India and Pakistan


Moderator: Shoma Chaudhury

Panelists:
Lt General (rtd) Asad Durrani, (Ex ISI Chief)
Farooq Abdullah, (Ex Chief Minister, Jammu & Kashmir, India)
Manish Tewari, (National Spokesman, Congress, India)
Mohammad Hanif, (Pakistani author)
William Dalrymple, (Author and Historian)
Swapan Dasgupta, (Political Commentator, India)

SESSION NOTE: In their founding vision, India and Pakistan chose different routes. India made a secular, rainbow society a constitutional cornerstone, whereas Pakistan envisioned itself as an Islamic State. In the 60 years that have passed, has this crucial choice played a seminal role in shaping the two countries? The Muslim orthodoxy, the ISI, Sharia laws -- has all of this set Pakistan at war with its own modernity? How does this affect Pakistan's relationship with the world and India 60 years later? Conversely, what role has religion played in determining India's relationship with itself and its neighbour? First, unvoiced prejudices, then slowly, the rise of the Hindu Right, the state of Muslims in India in general -- what role does all this play in the way our countries relate to each other? Is the role of religion the fundamental difference between the two countries?

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